Tag Archives: Honey bees

“NO BEES, NO HONEY” NEW PSA, FRIENDS OF THE EARTH, BEE ACTION CAMPAIGN

Newest PSA for Friends of the Earth “Bee Action” campaign. Please take action to protect our food sources around the world, and spread the word!

Starring Nicole Wolf and Austin Nimnicht.

Produced and directed by David Newsom, shot and edited by Will Morrison, soundtrack by Scott Seiver, audio mix by Unbridled Sound.

“An Extraordinary Glimpse into the First 21 Days of a Bee’s Life in 60 Seconds” (from “thisiscolossal.com”)

Amazing time-lapse, from the website, “This Is Colossal”

“In an attempt to better understand exactly what happens as a bee grows from an egg into an adult insect, photographer Anand Varma teamed up with the bee lab at UC Davis to film the first three weeks of a bee’s life in unprecedented detail, all condensed into a 60-second clip. Continue reading “An Extraordinary Glimpse into the First 21 Days of a Bee’s Life in 60 Seconds” (from “thisiscolossal.com”)

“LIKE FRUIT? SAVE A BEE” New PSA for Friends of The Earth “Bee Action”

Here we go, folks, the second in a series of three new spots for Friends of the Earth’s international “Bee Action” campaign. The campaign’s goal is end harmful pesticide use and the distribution of plants propagated with those pesticides for home and garden. Already previewed this on Facebook, but this is the spot’s coming out here on Some Day, All This.  Please spread the word, and take action. Produced and Directed by me, shot and edited by Will Morrison, sound design by Unbridled Sound.

5 Lessons The Los Angeles River Restoration Project Can Take From The High Line

Sian and Niko Check in with the Bee Population of The High Line
Sian and Niko Check in with the Bee Population of The High Line

My wife writes on a TV show that shoots in New York City. Twice a year or so, she needs to be on set for about 3 weeks. Up until Niko was born, this meant I got to wander Manhattan and Brooklyn, eat a lot of food, and meet old friends for drinks. Post-Niko, I can’t wheel around so freely. Luckily, the 26th street entrance to the High Line Park is three blocks away from where we stay, and I’ve taken to walking the length of it daily. I’m not alone. The staggering success of this post-industrial eyesore turned iconic city park is renowned world-wide, and evident from the throngs of locals and visitors alike wandering it’s 1.5 mile length, cameras pressed to faces, shooting in all directions, rain or shine.

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The High Line- Looking South from 28th Street Area

Floating above Chelsea, The High Line sublimely removes you from, and gives you a richer context for, the city you are in. It reminds me of the utopian designs imagined by Buckminster Fuller, of a city living in balance and harmony, saved by smart, conscious design. From its forested start at Gansevoort Street all the way to wild weeds of 31st Street, The High Line has a singular ability to constantly reframe Manhattan historically, architecturally and, most important from my perspective, naturally. Among all that the High Line is, an often overlooked thing is plant and animal habitat on a scale I didn’t think was possible in Manhattan. From spring into fall, the flowering plants of the High Line are vibrating with pollinators like honey bees, wasps, Monarch butterflies and Swallowtail butterflies, to name a few.

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Heading South on the High Line from 31st Street (Section #3)

This is all by design, of course. Not surprisingly, the radical re-invention of this abandoned rail line has made Chelsea one of the most desirable neighborhoods in Manhattan. And yes, for that very same reason, it has rabid detractors, but even they are a reflection of the parks huge draw. The question is, is the High Line an exportable park model, and if so, how? It’s hard not to look at this river of grass, concrete and steel and think of my adopted home, Los Angeles, and the saga of the LA River. Continue reading 5 Lessons The Los Angeles River Restoration Project Can Take From The High Line